Administrator
(0 votes)

Genomics England 70,000 Milestone

As the NHS celebrates its 70th birthday, Genomics England announces that it has now passed the 70,000 genomes mark. This milestone comes just five months after the 100,000 Genomes Project reached its halfway point – signalling that it is well on track to reach its goal of 100,000 genomes by the end of this year.

Genomics England has worked with the NHS to create the biggest national genome sequencing project of its kind in the world. It has provided the evidence NHS England needs to embed genome sequencing in routine care through the new Genomic Medicine Service (GMS). Rolling out in October 2018, the GMS will help to ensure that the NHS stays at the forefront of healthcare delivery – now and in the future.

The groundbreaking 100,000 Genomes Project focuses on patients with rare diseases, their families, and patients with cancer. Working with sequencing partner, Illumina, Genomics England has now sequenced a total of 71,095 genomes.

Beyond 2018, Genomics England will continue to support the NHS GMS, acting as a testbed for new applications, encouraging discoveries and their translation into novel medicines and treatments, as well as working to support a thriving genomic medicine industry in the UK.

Health Minister Lord O’Shaughnessy said: “Genetic sequencing can revolutionise healthcare by offering truly personalised care to patients and their families.

“This project is a shining example of a partnership between the public sector, the life sciences industry and the research community – with NHS patients reaping the benefits.

“Genomic medicine is no longer a thing of the future, it’s here now and helping to save lives.”

Genomics England’s CEO, Professor John Mattick, said: “Genomics England’s mission is to realise the enormous potential of genomic information to enable precision medicine.  As the technology and our understanding continue to grow over the coming years, we will provide genome analyses to inform personalised treatments and preventative actions tailored to individual circumstances, to ensure the best healthcare for our patients and generations to come.”

Professor Dame Sue Hill, Chief Scientific Officer for England, who is leading the NHS Genomics programme, said: “I’m delighted the Project has reached the 70,000 sequence mark in the week of the 70th Birthday of the National Health Service. The NHS has harnessed cutting-edge science and technology through the Project to deliver real benefits for patients with rare diseases and cancer and in the growing field of genomics and health we are, once more, building a world-leading service that is admired and respected across the globe.

“Reaching the 70,000 mark has been possible because of the contribution and support of all the patients and families involved and driven by the tremendous work done by the dedicated teams across the NHS in our Genomic Medicine Centres in providing the highest quality samples and data as part of routine care.”

Professor Mark Caulfield, Chief Scientist at Genomics England, said: “Genomics England was set up five years ago during the 65th celebrations of the NHS. The 100,000 Genomes Project is ground-breaking and on the 70th anniversary of the NHS it is amazing that we have now sequenced over 70,000 genomes from participants with rare disease and cancer – and we are grateful to everyone who has generously taken part in the Project. It has already changed the lives of many patients with cancer or a rare disease in the UK, and now this programme will expand to further transform genomic health in the NHS with improved outcomes for many more.”

Click to read more at the Genomics England website.

Contact Us

University of Liverpool

Block A: Waterhouse Buildings

1-5 Brownlow Street

Liverpool L69 3GL

Email: cjmcn@liverpool.ac.uk

Follow us